Geeks With Blogs
Jeremy Morgan Ramblings of a Polyglot coder
Building software is easy. Building well designed, good software is hard. Here are some of the most important pillars of good software design.

If you want to up your DevOps game, here are the books that will transform your knowledge and take you to the next level.

Strut up to that whiteboard with confidence by following this simple plan to nail your next technical interview.

I’m going to show you a cool new feature in .NET Core 3.0. Let’s say you want to create a simple, lean executable you can build and drop on to a server. And it doesn't have the .NET Core runtime.

For the 50th Anniversary of the Apollo 11 Moon Landing, take a tour of the code of the Apollo Guidance System.

We preach reusability and sometimes strive for it, but it rarely becomes a reality.

Imagine you’re working in a factory. You’re assembling Toyotas all day long, then your part won’t fit. What’s going on? You do this hundreds of times a day but now the bolts won’t go in. No reason to panic, you pull a cord to get help. Two co-workers arrive immediately. They find out you have a box of bolts with the wrong thread. They swap out the bolts, and you keep going.

Repeatable installs are all the rage in DevOps these days. As developers, we have this "automate everything" mentality, and for good reason. In this article, I'll show you how you can do that with an IIS installation as well. There's no reason to go hunting and pecking around the GUI every time you need to do this. This is the just one of many ways to automate IIS installs, which I'll be covering in the next few weeks.

So you've just started building .Net Core applications and really starting to gain some traction. You quickly learn how mature and thorough the .Net Core framework is becoming and think "I need to start writing some unit tests for this!". As it turns out, it's super easy and very intuitive, especially for C# developers.

What we need is a good bootable live USB stick for Windows. I’ve said this many times over the years, and hacked together things to make that very thing happen, but nothing that worked really well. So when the folks at Spyrus sent me a Windows to Go USB to check out, I was pretty excited.

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